Indy Ink: If You Aren't Having Fun...No One Is

If I've said it once, I've said it a million times: credit union people are the best human beings on the planet. Shortly after my latest keynote at the MAC conference in San Diego, longtime industry stalwart, Kent Dicken, wrote this very kind and thoughtful piece on the iDiz blog.

While I certainly don't deserve such recognition, the topic of gamification certainly does. If credit unions are going to optimize the value they deliver to members, communities, and employees, we must do more to customize experiences so that we find the sweet spot between anxiety and boredom. Each of us has different skill levels associated with every activity we undertake. It's incumbent upon system designers to evaluate skill levels on a constant basis, making sure that we deliver the appropriate challenges, coaching, and motivation that can build those skills through time.

On the surface this may not sound like much fun, but it's exactly what game designers do to make sure game players remain engaged. Progression through a game environment is met with increased levels of difficulty and complexity because every time a player overcomes an obstacle or completes a challenge, she is ultimately proving her skill level. If the game gets too hard too quickly for a player, she becomes anxious and disengaged. If the game is too easy for too long, the player gets bored and disengaged. As we fight to engage our audiences, whether they be internal or external, it's important to understand this relatively simple (though profound) concept.

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If you'd like to know more about how gamification may be leveraged by credit unions to engage audiences and solve problems, I'd love to connect. After all, if you're a credit union person, there's a pretty good chance that I already like you.

- Matt